country boy travels 206
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TRAVEL. EXPLORE. EXPERIENCE.

TRAVEL. EXPLORE. EXPERIENCE.

TRAVEL. EXPLORE. EXPERIENCE.

TRAVEL. EXPLORE. EXPERIENCE.

TRAVEL. EXPLORE. EXPERIENCE.

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Peru

peru

peru

Peru is a foodies paradise! From Maido to Central for those looking to explore creative and tasty food. What makes Peru interesting is the many micro climates conducive to growing and maintaining a variety of plant life and animals thereby creating some amazing food.

When you travel to this country you will experience a unique and flavorful drink known from this region as Pisco. In the 16th century the Jesuits produce a brandy-like grape liquor with grape brought from Spain that adapted well to the unique soil and desert climate in Peru. However, the name Pisco derived from a town in Santa Maria Magdalena which had a port named Pisco. The Port of Pisco became an important international trade center driving up the demand for the brandy-line liquor. By 1764, the production of Pisco surpassed the production of wine. 90 percent of the grapes in the region were used to make Pisco. In the 19th century the decline of the production of Pisco began. However, the 21st century is the reemergence of Pisco. In Peru, the fourth Sunday of July is ‘Pisco Day’; Pisco Sour Day is the first Saturday in February.

peru

peru

There are many excellent places to eat while you in Peru, but none like Central. This is a  stand-alone culinary experience. From the moment you stand at the door, you see the simple elegance of the restaurant. Yet you are about to experience and complex culinary experience that will take you through the different micro climates within Peru. What makes Central a great restaurant to visit is that chef Virgilio Veliz has introduced little-known ingredients such arapaima, fresh water found in the Amazon River or arracacha, a root vegetable from the Andes and created fresh and contemporary dishes that will wow you.  From the sea to the mountains you will feel the connection with the country and the unique ingredients found in Peru.

I stayed in Lima and traveled to the southern coast and desert. I loved how friendly the people were when I went out and how comfortable I felt in the country. I remember this older couple approaching me and asking how was my visit to Lima and what did I think of the food. We had a lovely conversation, then I asked were they expats, and the response was no Peruvian. I look forward to returning and visiting Machu Picchu and more of the food scene.